Please Know...

As I come to know these fine people, they share with me more of their personal and sensitive stories. Their collective story is what I am trying to share with you as my way of breaking the stereotypical beliefs that exist. "Blog names" have occasionally been given to me by the person whose story I am telling. Names are never their actual names and wherever I can do so, I might use the opposite pronoun (his/her, etc.) just to help increase their privacy.


Saturday, September 7, 2019

I don't know, go or care! Carry Narcan!!!


I don't know any addicted people.  I don't need to carry Narcan.

I don't go to any places where I might see an overdosing person.

I don't care if an overdosing person dies.  They chose to be an addict.



I don't know any addicted people.  I don't need to carry Narcan.

Substance Use Disorder patients are everywhere: in your neighborhoods, churches, shops, and highways.  You don't need to know a Substance Use Disorder patient to save their life if overdose tries to claim them.

Carry Narcan! 


I don't go to any places where I might see an overdosing person.

Substance use knows no boundaries nor borders.  Whether you live in a gated community or a housing project, heroin is hovering nearby.  If you're a high society individual who only goes to high society places, heroin is there and hiding in more pockets and purses than you can possibly imagine. 

When that day comes that you excuse yourself to use the restroom in your high society restaurant and you find a person lying on the floor or gasping for breath from inside a closed stall, you'll wish you carried some Narcan. 

1, 116 people died of an overdose in 2018 within the Philadelphia city limits.  Over 68,000 people died nationwide in 2018.  Many more than that were saved by Narcan, a stunning miracle drug that is reducing the number of parents who bury their children and reducing the number of children who have lost both parents from entering the foster care system.

Carry Narcan! 

                                                                                                                                                     
I don't care if an overdosing person dies.  They chose to be an addict.

It's shocking to me that some people feel this way. 

The topic of "choosing to be an addict" is an incredible error in understanding the issue. 

If you really don't care if that human being dies, even after you see them turning blue in your favorite restaurant's bathroom stall, I guarantee you that in the days to follow, you'll wake up at night wishing you'd carried Narcan: that simple to administer miracle drug that would have prevented you from carrying the emotional baggage of knowing that your ignorance contributed to the preventable ending of a life and that you could have been some person's and family's lifesaver hero.

Carry Narcan! 


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